May 23

Five Ways to Enhance Your Health this Season

I will admit, I still have my coat hanging next to my front door here in Chicago, even though it’s “Spring.” The rainy weather and gray sky is not holding me back on my plans for stepping into health this month, summer and beyond. Here is my game plan and suggestions for others looking to do the same.

5 Ways to Step-up Your Health this Spring and Summer:

  • Never overeat, nor undereat. I guess it doesn’t matter what season it is to follow this “rule,” but with warm weather, can come more BBQs, happy hours, social events, etc, and the last thing I would want any client to do is skip or skimp on their morning meal to “save” calories for the evening. Undereating can be just as stressful on the body as overeating. So what do you do? Eat smarter. Presume (or start) having a solid breakfast with at least 20-40 grams of protein (gender depending) and if you have a big night ahead, perhaps cut back on the carbohydrates you typically eat, but do not under do it. Leading to the afternoon’s or evening’s event, make smart choices, stay hydrated and eat clean. Once the party starts enjoy the company and the food, but not too much of either. Alcohol can inhibit our best interest and your hard work doesn’t need sabotaged by an extra drink.
  • Broaden your food choices. Come spring and summer, more lovely produce reaches their peak season. What does this mean? Easier (and cheaper) to locate, and the crops actually taste better. For example, it’s so easy to locate organic strawberries right now. Slice some up and threw them into scrambled eggs with coconut oil, dress them into a salad, eat them plain or with some almond milk or coconut cream. Hello tastebuds! I have also done up Brussel sprouts in a variety of ways from savory, with roasted onion and garlic, to sweet, baked with sliced dates. Get creative, keep your mouth entertained with the flavors this season has to offer.
  • Use food reward and palatability the right way to improve body fat. What do I mean? If a food is very palatable, people will eat 44% more of that food. And what I mean by “very palatable,” I am talking about industrialized (food with either added sugar, salt, color and/or added fat to enhance the flavor thus chemical response to our brain. If we eat whole food, in it’s natural form, we are less likely to over-consume. So know your triggers – perhaps something that is fat laden with sugar or starch (ice cream, fries, doughnuts, etc) or salty (think about the difference when eating raw almonds vs roasted, salted almonds, which will you eat more of?) and visual cues (we are more likely to eat more of a food if it’s multi-colored (tortilla chips) than if they were all the same color). The variety distracts your mind to understand how much you have eaten.
  • Nurture your sleep routine, and if you don’t have one, create one. When we are tired, we are less capable to sticking to our health choices. We often opt towards the sweeter, higher calorie foods. Overall, we as a nation, are getting 20% less sleep than we need. Less sleep = cognitive impairment. Less sleep shows about 300 more calories a day. We tend to be more impulsive on less sleep. Inhibitory control is lost. Sleep has the strongest correlation to obesity compared to diet and fitness. To enhance your sleep, allow an hour to 45 minutes before getting in bed to wind down (put the computer away). Have your bedroom at a cool temperature and create a pitch black room. Buy chamomile oils or lavender oils to help you relax and lastly when laying in bed, tell yourself all the things you are thinking, can be thought about tomorrow. 

BONUS!

  • Don’t compare yourself to others – our body’s, including metabolism and gene expressions all work in different ways. That is why some people can eat loads of bread and gain nothing, when the next person smells the stuff and puts on 5 pounds. Not literally, but I think you can level with me.
  •  Don’t major in minor things. Sometimes eating “perfectly” can do us more harm than good. The stress of adding a drop of cream in an organic coffee or a GMO corn kernel in a stir-fry is not worth the stress (depending on what type of lifestyle/diet you are trying to follow). Surely it is if you have intense negative symptoms from these foods (allergy) but don’t get your panties in a bundle over every bite you take. Focus on the main elements of eating clean and be satisfied if/when you have a superb eating day.

May 19

Smoothies!

If you have never tried a green smoothie, this recipe will be a good one to start with. Enjoy the flavor and more so, enjoy the health benefits.

Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

  • 2 large handfuls spinach leaves (2-3 cups)
  • 3-4 large romaine lettuce leaves
  • 1/2 avocado, peeled and pitted
  • 1/2-1/3 peeled banana, you can even use frozen to make the drink even colder (use less or more, depending on your carb needs)
  • 1/2 cup frozen berries
  • 1 tbsp hemp seeds or soaked chia seeds
  • 1/2 cup purified water, almond milk, coconut water or coconut milk
  • 3 ice cubes
  • 1 scoop Raw Protein powder
  • 1 tsp maca powder

Directions:

Wash all produce thoroughly and prepare it for the blender. Blend all ingredients until smooth; 30-60 seconds depending on your blender. Add more liquid if needed to blend. Best if served immediately (nutritionally and for taste).

Tip: The ingredient measurements in green smoothies are flexible, add more or less of any ingredients to your taste.

Similar articles:

10 Cancer-Fighting Juice & Smoothie Recipes

Mini Detox To Rev Up Your Metabolism

Heavy Metal Detox Juice (Good for PCOS clients or hypothyroid clients)

Surprising Things a 10 Day Juice Detox Taught Me

Also, check out this guide to continue building the perfect green drink.

May 09

Taco Time

Have you ever looked at the ingredient list on pre-made taco seasoning? If you have, you are aware of the unnecessary fillers such as corn starch and wheat. And these are the ingredients we can pronounce! My point being, is instead of buying a taco seasoning packet, simply use your spice rack for the Mexican dinner. This is what I do for my family.

Clean Eating Tacos:

  • 1 pound of grassfed beef (or very lean ground beef)
  • Optional – 1/2 onion and/or bell pepper
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika 
  • 3 tsp cumin
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper
  • 1/4 tsp fresh oregano (dried if frsh isn’t handy) 
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt or himalayan salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground pepper

Method:

Heat ground meat (and onion or some fresh diced bell pepper) on high.  Cook, stirring frequently to break up the meat, until fully cooked, about 8 minutes.
Add spices to beef.  If the meat appears dry, add 1-2 Tbsp of water. Stir to fully incorporate.
Turn temperature down to medium and cook another 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally. I often stir in some salsa at the very end to add more moisture and flavor.

Enjoy!

We usually eat our tacos w romaine lettuce leaves and homemade guacamole  Oh! And I can’t forget to mention, save the leftovers for a killer taco omelette in the morning.

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May 06

Foods to Fight Cancer

Taking charge of our health is one of the best things we can do for ourselves, including preventing cancer. Aim to be your best person, by choosing the best foods for your body. Looking at cancer prevention specifically, eat/drink more of these nutrient-rich foods.

Folate – a B vitamin, helps reduce the risk of colon, rectum and breast cancer. However, don’t mistake this naturally occurring vitamin for folic acid. Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate. Where should one seek out this nutrient? Check out strawberries, melons, asparagus, pasture-raised eggs, liver, sunflower seeds and leafy greens, to name a few. You may see people tout the benefits of fortified cereals and grains, however, I do not advise these foods. They can indeed deplete your nutrient stores due to phytates and other anti-nutrients. Make it a simple choice, choose food in it’s natural form.

Lycopene – I say tomato, you say tomato…load up my friends, and if the tomato product is heated (i.e. tomato sauce or paste), the lycopene may be more bio-available aka better to absorb.

Hydrate – and I am not talking about drinking sweet beverages or sodas. I am looking at the power of tea. Change up the variety you consume too. With the weather getting warmer, brew up some tea, allow it to cool and pour over some ice. Benefits come from the typical green tea to the herbal kind. Here are some of my favorite flavors. 

Spice – spice up your plate, palate and entree with spices. Specifically turmeric. Yet, dried and fresh herbs are loaded with antioxidants. Don’t be shy to spice up your plate.

Berries – these are my fruit of choice for myself and recommendation for clients. They are packed with health and research even shows the deactivation of certain cancer substances and slowing the growth of cancer.

Overall, aim to eat real, whole food. The story doesn’t change and you are left with nothing but positives. Whole, real food provide vitamins, minerals, water, fiber, all helping you avoid unwanted gene expression (cancer). One more pointer, enjoy foods of all colors. Diversify your plate starting with your grocery list.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

Apr 20

Input from Crossfit Owner, Low Carber Managing his Type 1 Diabetes – @Type1CrossFit

I had the pleasure in the last year to cross paths with Eric Pelletier, thanks to social media, and am thankful to see someone also living with type 1 diabetes and not being afraid to push their themselves physically and mentally to be in the best care of their ability. Today’s post captures an interview with Eric, and can be helpful to many others looking for inspiration and understanding on adapting to a healthy lifestyle for stable blood sugars and an optimal quality of life. Thank you for your time Eric!

Please tell us a little about yourself. From your social media updates, I see you are eating rather low carb and perhaps playing with some intermittent fasting (IF)?

You are correct I am still dabbling in IF and trying to maintain ketosis regularly. I also own Type 1 CrossFit in Wheeling, IL so it makes for a badass platform!

A little bit about me? Well I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at 28 days old. I am 26 now. For most of my life I was spoon fed a traditional diet (Food Pyramid) and put on an insulin sliding scales to maintain blood sugar levels. As a kid and through high school I was not very athletic; bowling. I was always afraid of what would happen if I went to hard and did not know how to manage my blood sugar levels.

Fast forward a few years, I began working at Naval Station Great Lakes in the Fitness Center and in this location I was introduced to CrossFit. When I heard about it I went home and read What Is Fitness and Foundations and it was like a light bulb clicked on. I was hooked as what I was reading made so much sense. Low carbohydrate diets, coupled with high skill movements, performed in a fashion that maximized results. Yep. I was hooked. 4 years later I am currently located at 9 Huntington Lane, Wheeling, Il, 60090 with Type 1 CrossFit.

What diets or food plans have you tried to control you blood sugar, and what has been the easiest and most successful? Why?

The easiest and most successful program sits beautifully inside my Diabetes management brainchild, but it is a diet void of food allergies or sensitivities, a diet that ensures maximum insulin sensitivity, and optimizes nutrient intake. If I remove things that cause problems in blood glucose levels/are inflammatory, minimize insulin needs, and eat vitamin and mineral rich foods, I don’t see how ANY case of diabetes is hard to manage. Think about this.

You only get one or a zero. Do you eat vegetables at every meal? Do you eat protein at every meal? Do you eat fat at every meal? Do you limit carbohydrates to post workout, primarily? Have you eliminated potentially problematic foods to see what happens? If you said no to any of these things, you are not doing what you could to optimize your health.

Personally I have also played with intermittent fasting as I find it quite fun, and very good at returning insulin sensitivity after maybe a tough training cycle or a bad eating day.

When you do intense workouts, such as Crossfit, how do you stabilize your blood sugar. Do you eat before/after and what do you do with your insulin dosages?

In my gym I always have juice on hand and insulin around. For me, as long as my blood sugar is in a good range, depending on what the workout is will depend on how I take care of it. Very short couplets get a nasty spike, so I bolus pre workout. Longer (15+) get a spike and then a drop so I will pace at about 80% and make sure to test immediately after to ensure I don’t drop too bad. Strength and skill pieces cause a drop due to the lack of “balls to the wall intensity.”

When you eat or have eaten a ketogenic-like diet, how is your insulin sensitivity affected?

Eating a ketogenic diet or IF, my insulin sensitivity is amazing! Here is a beautiful analogy! Spray perfume in a room and at first you smell it really strong right? After a few minutes you lose the sensitivity to smell it. In order to re-sensitize you have to either spray MORE or leave the room. In the case of the diabetic, MORE means more insulin which leads to fat gain, heart issues, and potentially many more issues. The other option is the remove the need to produce or TAKE insulin. Absence makes the heart grow fonder, and in this case, growing fonder means increasing sensitivity  Your body doesn’t realized the potency of what it had (good or bad) until it’s gone.

Before anyone else that has type 1 diabetes attempts a ketogenic diet, what do you first recommend before jumping in? For example, move to a moderately low-carb diet, and then tinker into ketosis, etc?

Be aware, your basal needs will drop DRAMATICALLY! Your body is at a baseline requirement level in relation to the current diet you have and what you are doing. If you make a dramatic change, it only stands to reason that your insulin needs need to change as well. I notice in online communities that this idea is overlooked. If your baseline levels are running lower (hypo), doesn’t it make sense to reduces your baseline insulin? Yes. My recommendation is to first and foremost, remove some potentially problematic foods. Wheat or dairy at first, and if you are eating sugar as a regular part of your diet, and not as a requirement to maintain a normal blood sugar, address that too. Remove one thing, adjust insulin, and repeat.

Kelly: As a dietitian working with many other patients with diabetes, changes need to be adapted slowly. It’s too hard to generalize what to do on a website, as we are all coming from different places. Work with a healthcare professional when making such changes. And of course, I am always happy to help. 

As for food groups or ingredients, are there any certain things you avoid, such as gluten, soy, dairy, etc? How does the avoidance or inclusion of certain foods help manage your blood sugars?

Gluten is terrible. End of story. Dairy, even with no carbs in it (cheese) causes a huge spike. I also find that if I have a big meal with virtually no carbohydrates (save veggies) I have an automatic increase in insulin sensitivity, and by default, lower blood sugars.

Kelly: I want to also add, in case anyone with type 1 diabetes is reading this post, overall this is general information. When eating a low carb diet, which may not include many carbs per meal, you still need to cover your meal for protein can convert into sugar. Please work with your team, myself included, to assess what the best protocol is for you.

How have your labs changed since adjusting your diet to low-carb?

My labs have improved greatly. At one point in my life I have hit 11 on my A1C. Recently I was at 6.5. not too bad for a lifer with this!

Some final thoughts:

Fix your food first. Do not fall victim to the idea that exercise will fix it all. If you eat poorly so as to induce inflammation, insulin insensitivity, and lack vital nutrients, you do not need to exercise. It may actually make it all SO MUCH WORSE.

Ask yourself this, why are you eating so many carbohydrates when the result is the need for insulin. Insulin managements and blood glucose management are the hallmark of BOTH cases of Diabetes. Why would you eat in a way that induces complications to that maintenance  That’s like being allergic to bees and kicking a bee hive. Not only is it crazy to do, but it does NOTHING to improve your health.

Where to find Eric:
@Type1Eric
@Type1CrossFit
www.facebook.com/crossfitovercome (soon to be /type1crossfit)
Email: eric@type1crossfit.com

Apr 15

Paleo Infused Nutrition “Granola”

Looking for an alternative for your morning meal? Perhaps some grain-free granola can be the perfect fit paired with either coconut milk/almond milk or Greek yogurt. Give this recipe a whirl and let me know how much you enjoy it!

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup almond meal
  • 3/4 cup raw pepitas/pumpkin seeds
  • 3/4 cup raw sunflower seeds (no shell)
  • 2 1/2 cup raw sliced almonds
  • 1 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes
  • 3/4 cup coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup raw honey (more if you desire)
  • 2 TBSP vanilla extract
  • 2 TBSP cinnamon
  • 2 tsp. sea salt

Method:

  • Preheat oven to 325 F. 
  • Mix all of the dry ingredients in a bowl. Set aside. 
  • Microwave the coconut oil, raw honey and vanilla extract together in a medium sized mixing bowl for about 30-45 seconds. 
  • Mix the wet ingredients into the dry.
  • Spread the granola mixture evenly onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and cook for about 20-25 minutes, stirring once or twice. Remove from heat and sprinkle with sea salt and cinnamon, pressing the mixture together to form a flat surface.
  • Allow to cool for about 20 minutes or until hardened, and then break into chunks and enjoy. 

This is really good anytime of the day and feel free to add on some fresh berries or sliced apple or pear. Yum, yum.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

Apr 11

Springtime Chicken Salad Recipe

Tis the season of great produce. Everything is sprouting up and more and more fruits and vegetables are approaching their peak season. It’s time to put aside the slow-cooker and pull out new recipes such as this Springtime Chicken Salad. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • 3 chicken breast, organic, free range
  • 1 1/2 cups celery, organic
  • 4 mandarin oranges, diced
  • 1/4 cup almond slivers
  • 1 cup halved green grapes, organic
  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • OJ

Method:

Marinate the chicken breast in orange juice over night.

The following day, or 4-6 hours later, boil chicken on medium for 25 minutes, or until cooked through. Drain chicken and set aside to cool.

While chicken chills, chop the celery, mandarin oranges, and grapes. MIx all ingredients together, including almonds. Shred chicken by hand or with forks and add to the mix. Lastly, add mayonnaise and salt and pepper. Add more or less to your preference. If you intend to keep the chicken salad over a few days, have some mayonnaise on the side to add later, to prevent it from tasting dry.

Enjoy this over a bed of greens or just plain. Perfect for a picnic, wedding shower, packed lunch, etc.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

Apr 09

5 Ways to Build a Better Salad

Salads can get boring and if we do not rotate our ingredients, we can ambush the success of enjoying such healthy nutrients. If you are guilty, like me, I used to buy the exact same ingredients, week after week. Not only did this put me at risk for nutritional gaps, but my taste-buds got bored with the same flavors, textures and color. Overall, a good salad should include protein, fat and some carbohydrate and a minimum of 4-5 ingredients. Here are 5 ways to build a better salad.

Shrimp Salad

  • 5 large shrimp, or 3/4 cup of shrimp (cooked then chilled), I prefer using my grill pan and cooking the shrimp with some spice and lemon juice
  • Cherry tomatoes, chopped cucumber, green onion
  • Seasonings/dressing: combine cilantro, lime juice and olive oil, salt and pepper. Toss with a bed of organic greens.

Tuna Caper Salad

  • 6 ounce can of all white tuna in water or pure olive oil (I will admit it’s hard to find tuna in 100% olive oil; read labels and stay away from fillers like soy)
  • Chopped celery and diced tomato
  • Seasonings/dressing: 1 tablespoon of capers (undrained), chopped parsley  dijon mustard, salt and pepper with a bed of organic greens.

Asian Salad

  • 4 ounce chicken breasts, skin on, organic, free-range
  • 1 cups Chinese cabbage, sliced thin
  • 1 large carrot, shredded
  • minced scallion
  • 1/8 cup sliced almonds
  • chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 TBS toasted sesame seeds
  • Seasoning/dressing: 1/2 TBS extra olive oil, 1/2 TBS tamari sauce, 1/8 cup rice vinegar, 1/4 TBS honey, pinch red pepper flakes

Snag and Kraut Salad

  • 1-2 cooked sausages (as I learned in Australia “snags” is jargon for sausages). Make sure to read the ingredient list on sausage and only buy ones that don’t have chemical nor high fructose corn syrup. I personally love snags sourced from the farmer’s market, US Wellness Meats or when in a pinch Trader Joe’s has a clean Chicken Italian Sausage. Lastly, if you are in the Chicago area, I have recently discovered an awesome butcher in Lincoln Park, Gepperth’s Meat Market on Halstead St. 
  • Chopped romaine lettuce, organic
  • 1-2 chopped carrot
  • 1 chopped cucumber
  • 2-3 TBS of fresh sauerkraut (the Green City Market has the best, or make your own)
  • Dressings/seasonings: I either use some mustard or use a little salsa to add some texture/liquid to my salad. The sauerkraut and sausage provide a lot of flavor without a dressing too.  

Homemade Chipotle

  • Slow roast 1-2 pounds of pork tenderloin, overnight with onions and spices (I like chili spices with my pork)
  • Fresh organic salad greens
  • Avocado, 1 small
  • Dressings/seasonings: salsa verde and freshly squeezed lime

Overall don’t limit yourself to ingredients traditionally in a salad. Throw anything in there – and it doesn’t have to be only vegetables. I love using fresh berries or diced apple in my salads. If I don’t have anything raw on hand, I will also put in some dried fruit. Load on herbs too. Such beautiful flavor adding a nice punch of antioxidants.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

Apr 07

Do You Know What’s in Season Right Now?

Back in the day, we could all probably answer this question within seconds, but with recent technology, communication and travel advances, our food is making it to our neighborhood grocery store, from around the world. So who knows if I would naturally be eating bing cherries right now? One way to tell, is of course, whip out a Google search, but also really pay attention to the food you are eating. For example, last month my typical lunch was a lettuce wrap of some sort, and when I made grassfed beef patties, I craved onion and tomato. How did my tomato taste and look? Guess. It was dull in color and nearly tasteless. Why? Tomatoes are provided year round but not at their peak. Before I run out and do my Sunday errands, I am gathering a grocery list and docking a few “seasonal” produce items on my list, so I can thoroughly enjoy the flavors of the season. Please note this list was pulled for the Illinois  Midwest area. If you live in another region, click here.

For April/May:

  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli (one of my favorites!)
  • Cabbage
  • Cherries
  • Cucumbers (I love cucumber and tahini sauce)
  • Greens
  • Herbs (I rotate the type of herbs I buy each week. They can dress up any meal)
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Onion
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Rhubarb
  • Spinach
  • Sprouts
  • Squash
  • Strawberries

Come June, I can enjoy some luscious tomatoes!

Cheers to you and good health, Kel

 

 

 

 

Mar 14

As If We Are Scientiest

Ever since I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 8 years old in 1992 I began to learn and understand that my activity, food choices, and mental health all had an impact on my diabetes, or what we check multiple times a day, my blood sugar. Can it get frustrating? Yes; I’m preaching to the choir. But it’s interesting. This situation (as in no one day is the same) allows me to understand my body in a way that others aren’t able to do (is this the silver lining??). I can truly assess how certain foods make me feel (energy, mood, mental clarity, blood sugar response, etc) and affect my insulin sensitivity.

Overall, I feel like a scientist when learning how to manage my diabetes and through the last 21 years I have most importantly learned, “There is no such thing as failure. It’s simply feedback. Assess, roll with the punches and carry-on.”

Sure it is easy to get down on myself when I slip up on diet, dismiss exercise and have a sub-optimal blood sugar reading to show for it, but what is that going to do for me? Nothing, and certainly nothing good. The right thing to do is to understand why a blood sugar is high or low (which sometimes can’t be pin-pointed) and think of a way how in the future, I can prevent the situation.

Having type 1 diabetes for 21 years and counseling others with type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes I have learned:

  • what macronutrient ratio (number of carbohydrates, verse fat verse protein) work best to have at each meal. For example, I do far better on a low carb diet where the margin of error is less when matching my insulin to my meal/carbohydrate content. Thanks to Dr. Bernstein’s book, Diabetes Solution, I truly grew to appreciate this concept. 
  • Firstly realizing this with myself, I do not thrive on gluten containing grains. Indeed, when I would eat whole grain bread my blood sugars were tougher to control (I did not fully realize this until 2009 when I did a 4 week gluten free diet; and I have been tested twice for celiac with negative results). Furthermore, looking at the data I am not the only person with diabetes finding this relationship. Research suggests that 10% of those with type 1 diabetes has celiac disease and this does not even encompass those with gluten sensitivity. Adding to this foreseen correlation a recent study just came out last year showing that a gluten free diet put a newly diagnosed 5 year old boy’s type 1 diabetes into remission. 
  • Supplements can have a place for people with diabetes. Especially real food supplements (I do not advocate synthetic supplements). I think the topline most important supplements are those that help strengthen our gut integrity and immunity. This can include fermented cod liver oil, vitamin D and a probiotic. Additional supplements can be of use, including chromium picolinate, gymnema sylvestre and magnesium.  
  • Sleep is crucial. If you have diabetes have you ever noticed an increase in insulin resistance with little sleep? When my sleep is rough, I can easily see an increase of 30 mg/dl+ in my readings. This starts in the morning and throughout the day I will notice an increase in cravings as well. talk about a lose-lose situation. 
  • Stress can act like a spoonful of sugar sometimes too. Can you relate with what I am saying? Even good stress can make my blood sugar go up. For example, I do a lot of public speaking and with this event, I am excited to present but have some nervous nerves and if I don’t give a small bolus I end-up with hyperglycemia. Managing stress is just as important in making smart choices of what to put on our plates. 
  • Exercise is so important (as if you already didn’t know). But this month, along with numerous other studies, a study published in Diabetes Care found that people with type 2 diabetes had better blood glucose control and an improvement in body composition. Besides this current study exercise (including walking, swimming, playing, tennis, you name it) can help your release stress, sleep better, have a more positive outlook on life and more. 
The underlying message here is that diabetes does bear a challenge, but it also gives us insight on what works for us. My diabetes is a daily reminder to not only count my blessings, but to push myself to be the healthiest I can be. We have to take the good with the bad and when our diabetes act up, we need to remind ourselves to take our emotions out of the equation and absorb the information as feedback. It’s as if we are our own scientist working on a daily experiment of optimal health.
Cheers to you and good health,
Kelly (Registered Dietitian Nutritionist)

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