Jun 10

Another T1 DM Using the Paleo Lifestyle to Manage Blood Sugars

photoI had the pleasure to connect with Shelby Hughes, a fellow type 1 diabetic, to talk about the great use of a paleo lifestyle to gain health, and more so find more ease in controlling blood sugars. Have a look at our conversation and please share if you have found similar things in your diet transition.

How long have you had diabetes? I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2008 at age 39 years old. Originally I was diagnosed with Type 2, but after changing my diet, taking oral medication and performing daily exercise wasn’t helping my blood sugars, I had additional lab work that confirmed I had the antibodies for Type 1.

What eating regime have you found to be most helpful in managing stable blood sugars and how did you come to find this diet? When I was first diagnosed with diabetes, I researched online and found that many diabetics (both Type 1 and 2) had been successful following a low carb diet. When I switched to this type of diet, I did see improvement in my blood sugars. However, I was not able to maintain a low-carb lifestyle for a long period of time. Eventually I “fell off the low-carb wagon” and started eating a Standard American Diet again. My blood sugars were always on a rollercoaster!  In January 2013, after hearing about the Paleo and Primal lifestyle from an online friend with diabetes, I decided I would try a Paleo framework for eating. Initially I was going to do it for just two weeks. After two weeks, I noticed that my blood sugars were AMAZINGLY stable. I didn’t have lows, I didn’t have highs. I never looked back!

What main improvements in your health have you observed, diabetic-related or not? Besides having very stable blood sugars (I can literally count on one hand the number BOTH lows and highs I’ve had since starting eating within the Primal/Paleo framework. My sleep has improved (I was having terrible issues with insomnia last fall, before changing my diet). I have lost weight, but I think that’s mainly because I’m staying within or just below my caloric requirements and I’ve increased my exercise. But I do have tons of energy. I was never a runner, EVER, but I completed my first 5K in March and I’m training now for a 10K. In fact, I never liked exercising at all, but now it’s like I HAVE to move my body or I feel like I’m going to crawl out of my skin! Other changes I’ve noticed are that my skin breaks out less and I don’t get mouth ulcers (I was getting them weekly before I made the changes).

Do you find the diet realistic and something to maintain long term? Would you recommend it to others managing their diabetes? I honestly believe this is a lifestyle I can manage long term. There are so many good Paleo substitutes for my favorite “comfort foods” that I just don’t feel like I’m missing out. I make cauliflower crust for my pizza, I make muffins with almond and coconut flour, I make “pasta” with spaghetti squash or zucchini “noodles”. Many people think that Paleo or Primal means “low carb” but it doesn’t have to! I eat tons of fruit and starchy vegetables like butternut squash and sweet potatoes. I am definitely eating carbs! And it’s funny…I’ve noticed that fruit and starchy veggies don’t spike my blood sugar like grains do. I won’t say that I’ll never eat another grain in my life…there may be a special occasion that warrants it! But since I love how I feel and love how stable my blood sugar is, it’s just not worth it to me to change back to eating a Standard American Diet.

What does a typical day of food look like to you? I’m a creature of habit, so I like to eat the same thing a lot of times.

Breakfast:  Green smoothie with fruits and veggies, a hardboiled egg, and bacon.

Lunch: a big (I mean big!) salad with grilled chicken, avocado, artichoke hearts, eggs, bacon, tomatoes, raisins, nuts, seeds, mushrooms, cucumbers, balsamic and olive oil dressing, and a nut flour muffin and fresh fruit.

Dinner: some kind of meat (pork, chicken, shellfish, beef), some kind of green vegetable (leafy greens or Brussels sprouts – usually whatever is fresh from the farmer’s market or available from our CSA bag) and some kind of starchy veggie or “grain-like” food – roasted butternut squash, acorn squash “fritters”, sweet potatoes, or maybe cauliflower “breadsticks.” I’m not really a “dessert” person, but I do drink a glass or two of red wine before dinner each night.

What is the best thing about the diet? One of the best things is that you can pretty much eat anywhere and get something that falls within the framework. When I first started, I had to go out of town for work and stay at a hotel. Of course that means eating out every meal. But you can get a big salad pretty much anywhere, and you can always ask that your “burger” or whatever be served without a bun. Of course now when I travel I plan ahead and pack snacks that can be meals: hardboiled eggs, homemade beef jerky, kale chips, homemade “larabars”, fruit, nuts, seeds, etc.

Any tips for someone getting started on this type of diet? Before I started, I bought the cookbook “Practical Paleo” by Diane Sanfilippo.  It has the most beautiful full page pictures of food and some great recipes. I bought the book and decided I would make something from it each week. Next thing I knew I had tried several new foods that my husband and I both loved, and it was easy to transition to the next step of eliminating grains. I also used many blogs on the internet – you can google any food and add the keywords “paleo” or “primal” and get tons of great recipes. Mark’s Daily Apple is another great resource for people wanting more information.

Anything in addition you’d like to say? I think some people get the wrong idea about the Paleo or Primal framework because like with all things, there are extremists out in the land of the internet. Also, depending on the source, different people have different ideas about what is “paleo” and what is not. I think that there is no black and white answer…it’s not about “what the cavemen ate,” it’s about nourishing your body with foods that you love and that help your body perform at its very best.

Thanks for sharing your insight Shelby! Perhaps your story will inspire others to seek change and gain health.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kel

Jun 02

Recommended Grocery List

If we fail to plan, we plan to fail. Eating healthy begins with a good grocery list and having an idea of what meals to make for the week ahead. More tips and advice below.

Produce - focusing on seasonal produce and organic if possible

  • Veggies – lots and lots!
  • Sweet potatoes – great for sweet potato chips or just oven roasted with butter or coconut oil.
  • Mushrooms – use these in everything, from eating raw to throwing in eggs.
  • Wild green
  • Broccoli – usually buy frozen in bulk, therefore, no stress on consuming it before it may spoil.
  • Zucchini, asparagus, brussels sprouts, cabbage, all pending on the planned meals for the week.
  • Cauliflower – use as cauli mash or cauli rice.
  • Fresh herbs – can really change the way a meal tastes, and provide antioxidants and helps detoxify our body.
  • Avocado – helps heal us from the inside out.
  • Frozen berries – for those nights I want something sweet – coconut cream, cocoa nibs and berries.
  • Bananas – so good frozen
  • Jicama – full of fiber and great for dicing in a stiry-fry, salad or slice cylinders and use as a chip.
  • Lemons/Limes

Health Tips:

Eat fermented foods daily. You can find options at Whole Foods (including Kombucha), fermented vegetables at the farmer’s market and online at wisechoicemarket.com.

Overall diversify the types of produce you eat weekly, even simply rotate the type of salad greens you eat.

Meat/Seafood

  • Anything grass fed/free range at a good price – beef, lamb, venison, pork
  • Nitrate free bacon - shortcut or Canadian bacon
  • Organic, free-range poultry – opt for skin-on, bone in. Both of these elements are mineral rich and good for our body.
  • No nitrate, hormone free, gluten free deli meat (Boar’s Head, Applegate, Columbus
  • WILD Salmon, tilapia, scallops, calamari, tuna, cod, shrimp – usually buy frozen and some fresh if eating same day.
  • Sardines

Health Tips:

If you don’t have access to quality protein sources there are some great online stores and possible local CSA’s. I recommend US Wellness Meats, Tropical Traditions, Vital Choice (awesome seafood) and Eat Wild websites. Amazon is great for getting certain ingredients, including jerky.

Choose wild caught fish and not farmed. The nutritional profiles in wild are better and contain fewer toxins.

Dairy

  • Organic (grassfed is even better) butter
  • Full fat, organic and grassfed cheese
  • Free range, organic eggs

Compared to official U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data for commercial eggs, eggs from hens raised on pasture contain: 1/3 less cholesterol, 1/4 less saturated fat, 2/3 more vitamin A, 2 times more omega- 3 fatty acids, 3 times more vitamin E, and 7 times more beta carotene.*

Aisles

  • Pickles
  • Oils such as coconut, macadamia nut and high quality olive oil
  • Nuts – store them in a cool place, heat can turn them rancid
  • Coconut flour and cream/milk
  • Dark chocolate and cocoa nibs
  • Himalayan sea salt
  • Hot sauce and spices
  • Tea and coffee (organic coffee)
  • Raw honey (real raw honey)
  • Salsa ( no corn or wheat ingredients)
  • Chia, hemp, whole seeds (soak chia seeds overnight in water or unsweetened almond milk/coconut milk to have a porridge like texture)
  • Tamari (gluten free soy sauce)

References:
Lopez-Bote, C. J., R.Sanz Arias, A.I. Rey, A. Castano, B. Isabel, J. Thos (1998). “Effect of free-range feeding on omega-3 fatty acids and alpha-tocopherol content and oxidative stability of eggs.” Animal Feed Science and Technology 72: 33-40.

May 29

Happy Birthday My Love! @ChiSchmidtty

We’ve been through a lot together, 

You’ve seen my at my best, my worst, and first thing in the morning.

We’ve laughed and kissed and argued and loved, and held hands.

When I look back on this story of “us,”

I realize I’m happier than I’ve ever been. 

And it’s all because of you.

Happy birthday with all my love! 

bday

May 23

Five Ways to Enhance Your Health this Season

I will admit, I still have my coat hanging next to my front door here in Chicago, even though it’s “Spring.” The rainy weather and gray sky is not holding me back on my plans for stepping into health this month, summer and beyond. Here is my game plan and suggestions for others looking to do the same.

5 Ways to Step-up Your Health this Spring and Summer:

  • Never overeat, nor undereat. I guess it doesn’t matter what season it is to follow this “rule,” but with warm weather, can come more BBQs, happy hours, social events, etc, and the last thing I would want any client to do is skip or skimp on their morning meal to “save” calories for the evening. Undereating can be just as stressful on the body as overeating. So what do you do? Eat smarter. Presume (or start) having a solid breakfast with at least 20-40 grams of protein (gender depending) and if you have a big night ahead, perhaps cut back on the carbohydrates you typically eat, but do not under do it. Leading to the afternoon’s or evening’s event, make smart choices, stay hydrated and eat clean. Once the party starts enjoy the company and the food, but not too much of either. Alcohol can inhibit our best interest and your hard work doesn’t need sabotaged by an extra drink.
  • Broaden your food choices. Come spring and summer, more lovely produce reaches their peak season. What does this mean? Easier (and cheaper) to locate, and the crops actually taste better. For example, it’s so easy to locate organic strawberries right now. Slice some up and threw them into scrambled eggs with coconut oil, dress them into a salad, eat them plain or with some almond milk or coconut cream. Hello tastebuds! I have also done up Brussel sprouts in a variety of ways from savory, with roasted onion and garlic, to sweet, baked with sliced dates. Get creative, keep your mouth entertained with the flavors this season has to offer.
  • Use food reward and palatability the right way to improve body fat. What do I mean? If a food is very palatable, people will eat 44% more of that food. And what I mean by “very palatable,” I am talking about industrialized (food with either added sugar, salt, color and/or added fat to enhance the flavor thus chemical response to our brain. If we eat whole food, in it’s natural form, we are less likely to over-consume. So know your triggers – perhaps something that is fat laden with sugar or starch (ice cream, fries, doughnuts, etc) or salty (think about the difference when eating raw almonds vs roasted, salted almonds, which will you eat more of?) and visual cues (we are more likely to eat more of a food if it’s multi-colored (tortilla chips) than if they were all the same color). The variety distracts your mind to understand how much you have eaten.
  • Nurture your sleep routine, and if you don’t have one, create one. When we are tired, we are less capable to sticking to our health choices. We often opt towards the sweeter, higher calorie foods. Overall, we as a nation, are getting 20% less sleep than we need. Less sleep = cognitive impairment. Less sleep shows about 300 more calories a day. We tend to be more impulsive on less sleep. Inhibitory control is lost. Sleep has the strongest correlation to obesity compared to diet and fitness. To enhance your sleep, allow an hour to 45 minutes before getting in bed to wind down (put the computer away). Have your bedroom at a cool temperature and create a pitch black room. Buy chamomile oils or lavender oils to help you relax and lastly when laying in bed, tell yourself all the things you are thinking, can be thought about tomorrow. 

BONUS!

  • Don’t compare yourself to others – our body’s, including metabolism and gene expressions all work in different ways. That is why some people can eat loads of bread and gain nothing, when the next person smells the stuff and puts on 5 pounds. Not literally, but I think you can level with me.
  •  Don’t major in minor things. Sometimes eating “perfectly” can do us more harm than good. The stress of adding a drop of cream in an organic coffee or a GMO corn kernel in a stir-fry is not worth the stress (depending on what type of lifestyle/diet you are trying to follow). Surely it is if you have intense negative symptoms from these foods (allergy) but don’t get your panties in a bundle over every bite you take. Focus on the main elements of eating clean and be satisfied if/when you have a superb eating day.

May 19

Smoothies!

If you have never tried a green smoothie, this recipe will be a good one to start with. Enjoy the flavor and more so, enjoy the health benefits.

Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

  • 2 large handfuls spinach leaves (2-3 cups)
  • 3-4 large romaine lettuce leaves
  • 1/2 avocado, peeled and pitted
  • 1/2-1/3 peeled banana, you can even use frozen to make the drink even colder (use less or more, depending on your carb needs)
  • 1/2 cup frozen berries
  • 1 tbsp hemp seeds or soaked chia seeds
  • 1/2 cup purified water, almond milk, coconut water or coconut milk
  • 3 ice cubes
  • 1 scoop Raw Protein powder
  • 1 tsp maca powder

Directions:

Wash all produce thoroughly and prepare it for the blender. Blend all ingredients until smooth; 30-60 seconds depending on your blender. Add more liquid if needed to blend. Best if served immediately (nutritionally and for taste).

Tip: The ingredient measurements in green smoothies are flexible, add more or less of any ingredients to your taste.

Similar articles:

10 Cancer-Fighting Juice & Smoothie Recipes

Mini Detox To Rev Up Your Metabolism

Heavy Metal Detox Juice (Good for PCOS clients or hypothyroid clients)

Surprising Things a 10 Day Juice Detox Taught Me

Also, check out this guide to continue building the perfect green drink.

May 09

Taco Time

Have you ever looked at the ingredient list on pre-made taco seasoning? If you have, you are aware of the unnecessary fillers such as corn starch and wheat. And these are the ingredients we can pronounce! My point being, is instead of buying a taco seasoning packet, simply use your spice rack for the Mexican dinner. This is what I do for my family.

Clean Eating Tacos:

  • 1 pound of grassfed beef (or very lean ground beef)
  • Optional – 1/2 onion and/or bell pepper
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika 
  • 3 tsp cumin
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper
  • 1/4 tsp fresh oregano (dried if frsh isn’t handy) 
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt or himalayan salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground pepper

Method:

Heat ground meat (and onion or some fresh diced bell pepper) on high.  Cook, stirring frequently to break up the meat, until fully cooked, about 8 minutes.
Add spices to beef.  If the meat appears dry, add 1-2 Tbsp of water. Stir to fully incorporate.
Turn temperature down to medium and cook another 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally. I often stir in some salsa at the very end to add more moisture and flavor.

Enjoy!

We usually eat our tacos w romaine lettuce leaves and homemade guacamole  Oh! And I can’t forget to mention, save the leftovers for a killer taco omelette in the morning.

IMG_2090

May 06

Foods to Fight Cancer

Taking charge of our health is one of the best things we can do for ourselves, including preventing cancer. Aim to be your best person, by choosing the best foods for your body. Looking at cancer prevention specifically, eat/drink more of these nutrient-rich foods.

Folate – a B vitamin, helps reduce the risk of colon, rectum and breast cancer. However, don’t mistake this naturally occurring vitamin for folic acid. Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate. Where should one seek out this nutrient? Check out strawberries, melons, asparagus, pasture-raised eggs, liver, sunflower seeds and leafy greens, to name a few. You may see people tout the benefits of fortified cereals and grains, however, I do not advise these foods. They can indeed deplete your nutrient stores due to phytates and other anti-nutrients. Make it a simple choice, choose food in it’s natural form.

Lycopene – I say tomato, you say tomato…load up my friends, and if the tomato product is heated (i.e. tomato sauce or paste), the lycopene may be more bio-available aka better to absorb.

Hydrate – and I am not talking about drinking sweet beverages or sodas. I am looking at the power of tea. Change up the variety you consume too. With the weather getting warmer, brew up some tea, allow it to cool and pour over some ice. Benefits come from the typical green tea to the herbal kind. Here are some of my favorite flavors. 

Spice – spice up your plate, palate and entree with spices. Specifically turmeric. Yet, dried and fresh herbs are loaded with antioxidants. Don’t be shy to spice up your plate.

Berries – these are my fruit of choice for myself and recommendation for clients. They are packed with health and research even shows the deactivation of certain cancer substances and slowing the growth of cancer.

Overall, aim to eat real, whole food. The story doesn’t change and you are left with nothing but positives. Whole, real food provide vitamins, minerals, water, fiber, all helping you avoid unwanted gene expression (cancer). One more pointer, enjoy foods of all colors. Diversify your plate starting with your grocery list.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

Apr 20

Input from Crossfit Owner, Low Carber Managing his Type 1 Diabetes – @Type1CrossFit

I had the pleasure in the last year to cross paths with Eric Pelletier, thanks to social media, and am thankful to see someone also living with type 1 diabetes and not being afraid to push their themselves physically and mentally to be in the best care of their ability. Today’s post captures an interview with Eric, and can be helpful to many others looking for inspiration and understanding on adapting to a healthy lifestyle for stable blood sugars and an optimal quality of life. Thank you for your time Eric!

Please tell us a little about yourself. From your social media updates, I see you are eating rather low carb and perhaps playing with some intermittent fasting (IF)?

You are correct I am still dabbling in IF and trying to maintain ketosis regularly. I also own Type 1 CrossFit in Wheeling, IL so it makes for a badass platform!

A little bit about me? Well I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at 28 days old. I am 26 now. For most of my life I was spoon fed a traditional diet (Food Pyramid) and put on an insulin sliding scales to maintain blood sugar levels. As a kid and through high school I was not very athletic; bowling. I was always afraid of what would happen if I went to hard and did not know how to manage my blood sugar levels.

Fast forward a few years, I began working at Naval Station Great Lakes in the Fitness Center and in this location I was introduced to CrossFit. When I heard about it I went home and read What Is Fitness and Foundations and it was like a light bulb clicked on. I was hooked as what I was reading made so much sense. Low carbohydrate diets, coupled with high skill movements, performed in a fashion that maximized results. Yep. I was hooked. 4 years later I am currently located at 9 Huntington Lane, Wheeling, Il, 60090 with Type 1 CrossFit.

What diets or food plans have you tried to control you blood sugar, and what has been the easiest and most successful? Why?

The easiest and most successful program sits beautifully inside my Diabetes management brainchild, but it is a diet void of food allergies or sensitivities, a diet that ensures maximum insulin sensitivity, and optimizes nutrient intake. If I remove things that cause problems in blood glucose levels/are inflammatory, minimize insulin needs, and eat vitamin and mineral rich foods, I don’t see how ANY case of diabetes is hard to manage. Think about this.

You only get one or a zero. Do you eat vegetables at every meal? Do you eat protein at every meal? Do you eat fat at every meal? Do you limit carbohydrates to post workout, primarily? Have you eliminated potentially problematic foods to see what happens? If you said no to any of these things, you are not doing what you could to optimize your health.

Personally I have also played with intermittent fasting as I find it quite fun, and very good at returning insulin sensitivity after maybe a tough training cycle or a bad eating day.

When you do intense workouts, such as Crossfit, how do you stabilize your blood sugar. Do you eat before/after and what do you do with your insulin dosages?

In my gym I always have juice on hand and insulin around. For me, as long as my blood sugar is in a good range, depending on what the workout is will depend on how I take care of it. Very short couplets get a nasty spike, so I bolus pre workout. Longer (15+) get a spike and then a drop so I will pace at about 80% and make sure to test immediately after to ensure I don’t drop too bad. Strength and skill pieces cause a drop due to the lack of “balls to the wall intensity.”

When you eat or have eaten a ketogenic-like diet, how is your insulin sensitivity affected?

Eating a ketogenic diet or IF, my insulin sensitivity is amazing! Here is a beautiful analogy! Spray perfume in a room and at first you smell it really strong right? After a few minutes you lose the sensitivity to smell it. In order to re-sensitize you have to either spray MORE or leave the room. In the case of the diabetic, MORE means more insulin which leads to fat gain, heart issues, and potentially many more issues. The other option is the remove the need to produce or TAKE insulin. Absence makes the heart grow fonder, and in this case, growing fonder means increasing sensitivity  Your body doesn’t realized the potency of what it had (good or bad) until it’s gone.

Before anyone else that has type 1 diabetes attempts a ketogenic diet, what do you first recommend before jumping in? For example, move to a moderately low-carb diet, and then tinker into ketosis, etc?

Be aware, your basal needs will drop DRAMATICALLY! Your body is at a baseline requirement level in relation to the current diet you have and what you are doing. If you make a dramatic change, it only stands to reason that your insulin needs need to change as well. I notice in online communities that this idea is overlooked. If your baseline levels are running lower (hypo), doesn’t it make sense to reduces your baseline insulin? Yes. My recommendation is to first and foremost, remove some potentially problematic foods. Wheat or dairy at first, and if you are eating sugar as a regular part of your diet, and not as a requirement to maintain a normal blood sugar, address that too. Remove one thing, adjust insulin, and repeat.

Kelly: As a dietitian working with many other patients with diabetes, changes need to be adapted slowly. It’s too hard to generalize what to do on a website, as we are all coming from different places. Work with a healthcare professional when making such changes. And of course, I am always happy to help. 

As for food groups or ingredients, are there any certain things you avoid, such as gluten, soy, dairy, etc? How does the avoidance or inclusion of certain foods help manage your blood sugars?

Gluten is terrible. End of story. Dairy, even with no carbs in it (cheese) causes a huge spike. I also find that if I have a big meal with virtually no carbohydrates (save veggies) I have an automatic increase in insulin sensitivity, and by default, lower blood sugars.

Kelly: I want to also add, in case anyone with type 1 diabetes is reading this post, overall this is general information. When eating a low carb diet, which may not include many carbs per meal, you still need to cover your meal for protein can convert into sugar. Please work with your team, myself included, to assess what the best protocol is for you.

How have your labs changed since adjusting your diet to low-carb?

My labs have improved greatly. At one point in my life I have hit 11 on my A1C. Recently I was at 6.5. not too bad for a lifer with this!

Some final thoughts:

Fix your food first. Do not fall victim to the idea that exercise will fix it all. If you eat poorly so as to induce inflammation, insulin insensitivity, and lack vital nutrients, you do not need to exercise. It may actually make it all SO MUCH WORSE.

Ask yourself this, why are you eating so many carbohydrates when the result is the need for insulin. Insulin managements and blood glucose management are the hallmark of BOTH cases of Diabetes. Why would you eat in a way that induces complications to that maintenance  That’s like being allergic to bees and kicking a bee hive. Not only is it crazy to do, but it does NOTHING to improve your health.

Where to find Eric:
@Type1Eric
@Type1CrossFit
www.facebook.com/crossfitovercome (soon to be /type1crossfit)
Email: eric@type1crossfit.com

Apr 15

Paleo Infused Nutrition “Granola”

Looking for an alternative for your morning meal? Perhaps some grain-free granola can be the perfect fit paired with either coconut milk/almond milk or Greek yogurt. Give this recipe a whirl and let me know how much you enjoy it!

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup almond meal
  • 3/4 cup raw pepitas/pumpkin seeds
  • 3/4 cup raw sunflower seeds (no shell)
  • 2 1/2 cup raw sliced almonds
  • 1 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes
  • 3/4 cup coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup raw honey (more if you desire)
  • 2 TBSP vanilla extract
  • 2 TBSP cinnamon
  • 2 tsp. sea salt

Method:

  • Preheat oven to 325 F. 
  • Mix all of the dry ingredients in a bowl. Set aside. 
  • Microwave the coconut oil, raw honey and vanilla extract together in a medium sized mixing bowl for about 30-45 seconds. 
  • Mix the wet ingredients into the dry.
  • Spread the granola mixture evenly onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and cook for about 20-25 minutes, stirring once or twice. Remove from heat and sprinkle with sea salt and cinnamon, pressing the mixture together to form a flat surface.
  • Allow to cool for about 20 minutes or until hardened, and then break into chunks and enjoy. 

This is really good anytime of the day and feel free to add on some fresh berries or sliced apple or pear. Yum, yum.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

Apr 11

Springtime Chicken Salad Recipe

Tis the season of great produce. Everything is sprouting up and more and more fruits and vegetables are approaching their peak season. It’s time to put aside the slow-cooker and pull out new recipes such as this Springtime Chicken Salad. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • 3 chicken breast, organic, free range
  • 1 1/2 cups celery, organic
  • 4 mandarin oranges, diced
  • 1/4 cup almond slivers
  • 1 cup halved green grapes, organic
  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • OJ

Method:

Marinate the chicken breast in orange juice over night.

The following day, or 4-6 hours later, boil chicken on medium for 25 minutes, or until cooked through. Drain chicken and set aside to cool.

While chicken chills, chop the celery, mandarin oranges, and grapes. MIx all ingredients together, including almonds. Shred chicken by hand or with forks and add to the mix. Lastly, add mayonnaise and salt and pepper. Add more or less to your preference. If you intend to keep the chicken salad over a few days, have some mayonnaise on the side to add later, to prevent it from tasting dry.

Enjoy this over a bed of greens or just plain. Perfect for a picnic, wedding shower, packed lunch, etc.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

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