Jul 02

What I’ve Eaten So Far Today

It’s been too long since I have captured what I have eaten on my blog, and when asked by a client today, I thought I’d share with all. Thirty-three weeks pregnant, with few to no cravings, yet, anything too flavorful or sweet upsets my stomach.

8AM – Breakfast – (Blood sugar 86 mg/dl)

Beet Protein Smoothie

- 1 large cooked beet (picked up some from Costco)

– 5 large celery stalks

– 1 tablespoon of soaked chia seeds

– 1/2 tsp of maca powder

– 4 ounces of almond milk

– 4 ounces of water

– 1 scoop raw protein powder

While making smoothie I had a spoonful of almond butter (I was starving)

 

10:30 – AM Snack – (Blood sugar 96 mg/dl)

Kind mini bar

1 oz of Kerrygold grass-fed cheese

 

12:15 – Lunch – (Blood sugar 111 mg/dl)

Romaine lettuce sandwich

- 2 large romaine lettuce leaves

– 3 ounces of Chicken Columbus brand deli meat

– 2 large green garlic stuffed olives, sliced for “sandwich”

– Yellow mustard

5-8 baby carrots w/ tahini dip

1/2 large organic apple

1 square of dark chocolate

 

3:30 – PM Snack – (Blood sugar 81 mg/dl)

Second half of organic large apple

1 hard boiled egg

2 strawberries

 

Overall, I have found that having set meal and snack times is important to control my blood sugar, portions and hunger. Overall, I am eating more carbohydrates during pregnancy, and focusing heavily on eating intuitively. One thing is for sure, I can’t eat spicy food like I used to!

Jul 01

Elimination Diets

Most recently, I was interviewed by a fellow dietitian, Aglaee Jacobs about how I use elimination diets with my clients. Her well-written article captures some great research and suggestions for patients who manage their arthritis, diabetes, IBS, and other chronic conditions with diet.

Have a read by clicking on this Today’s Dietitian link.

 

Jun 17

Using the Paleo Diet to Manage Type 1 Diabetes & Hypothyroid

alexiskimphotoMost recently I have conversed with some lovely individuals about how we use diet to stabilize blood sugars. Today, I have captured a Q & A with Alexis to inspire others to focus on diet to gain health.

How long have you had diabetes? I was diagnosed in 2012 at the age of 28.  I had gestational diabetes with my daughter the year before and when I initially found out they insisted I was Type 2 (even though both of my uncles found out they were Type 1 in their 30s).  They wanted me to take medication as a Type 2 but after 3 weeks of having blood sugars in the 200s and 300s I insisted they put me on an insulin regimen. More bloodwork was done and type 1 diabetes was confirmed along with hypothyroid. Haven’t looked back since

What eating regime have you found to be most helpful in managing stable blood sugars and how did you come to find this diet? I was extremely proactive about managing my diabetes after I found out. Sure I was upset at first but at the time I had a 2 ½ year old and a 1 year old and all I could think of was how horrible it would be for me to leave my children with no mom. I discovered paleo early on by doing online research and intentions to keep carbs to a minimum.  My A1c went from 8.3 when diagnosed to 5.5 in just a few months. If that’s not proof I don’t know what is!

What main improvements in your health have you observed, diabetic-related or not? Overall health has improved. I have much better mental clarity.  I feel less moody and irritable. I also notice a difference in my hair, skin and nails. I have tons of baby hair growing and I no longer have strange ridges in my nails. After being diagnosed I also discovered that I am definitely gluten intolerant and cannot eat legumes.  I used to think I had acne in high school but in retrospect it was these things manifesting themselves. My skin is perfectly clear after going paleo. Paleo has also helped me maintain my weight. I weighed 103 when diagnosed and looked very malnourished. I gained some weight back but have been able to maintain it by eating this way. I also have to add that my dental health has improved ten fold. After many years of terrible dental visits I haven’t had one cavity and in fact, the last time I went for a cleaning my dentist said my teeth were so clean he didn’t even need to clean them!

Do you find the diet realistic and something to maintain long term? Would you recommend it to others managing their diabetes? I don’t consider paleo a diet. It is a lifestyle. In my case I had been eating and doing things a certain way for 28 years and then all of a sudden was told that I had to change. I was forced to make a change because of my diabetes and I consider that a blessing but others who want to make a change without being forced to may have difficulty in the beginning. With that said, after small steps, it is definitely realistic and easy to maintain long term. I recommend this way of eating to everyone not just diabetics. It is my opinion that if it is good for a diabetic then it is probably good for you too!

What does a typical day of food look like to you? I am so lucky to be married to a Korean man! I love Korean food, especially authentic Korean food. My mother in law is one of the last generations to ferment her own kimchi (not just cabbage either, this woman knows how to ferment ANYTHING).  She also ferments her own soybean paste which is a lost art even in Korea these days. We eat some sort of soup at least once everyday. My kids really like Korean seaweed soups and bone broth. My favorite dish is Korean style braised pork belly (super easy!). I never take a grocery list to the market. I buy what looks good or is in season and then I work with that. In general as my mother in law has taught me, I try to cook with what I have without having a structured menu. My carbs mainly come from vegetables unless I treat and have some roasted sweet potato.

What is the best thing about the diet? The best thing about eating this way for me is the mental clarity and amazing amount of energy I now have. I feel so much more alive like I am actually living after eating this way. One can take being diagnosed as diabetic as an early death sentence but managing my diabetes this way makes me feel so much more appreciative and satisfied with the life I am living.

Any tips for someone getting started on this type of diet? The first book I read was Mark Sisson’s the Primal Blueprint. I loved that it was written simple enough for everyone to understand. When it is easy for us to understand it is much easier for us to make a change. Also, it is easy to want to feel like you need to dive right in, but really what helped me in the beginning was taking small baby steps. For example, at first, I didn’t eat rice (blasphemous in a Korean house!). I still would have a piece of bread but no rice. Then, no more bread, after that, no oatmeal,. then eliminated grains, then legumes, then I started focusing on the quality of meat I was eating, etc.  If I hadn’t done it that way I am sure I would have felt overwhelmed and deprived.  At some point I decided on what number of carbs I wanted to eat everyday as well. That definitely helped the transition.

Anything in addition you’d like to say? There is a lot of misconceptions about what paleo is. It is more about what it is not.  It is also not one size fits all and others should keep in mind that there is an experimentation period. I believe this is necessary. You have to eat everything and then listen to your body. It may say “I don’t like that but I love this!”  Although the word paleo is often used I personally like to use the word primal. If you look up the word primal in the dictionary it also means important. And that is what my health and well being is to me! I have created this beta website www.modernprimalexchange.com to encourage this health movement to grow!

Jun 15

Eating Right Sans Chef Skills or CEO Paycheck

Eating a balanced diet doesn’t need to be labor-intensive or costly. With proper planning, savvy shopping and smart choices, you can save your mola and feel good. Here I am highlighting some how-tos on eating healthy on a budget, catered to those looking after blood sugar control, which in a way, relates to everyone. What do I mean?

Even people without diagnosed hypoglycemia, diabetes, insulin resistance, etc, should still consider how food affects blood sugar control. Blood sugar affects our moods, sleep, inflammation, energy and more. Overall, a diet balanced in good fat, protein and moderate carbohydrates is a recipe for well-being, thus, the more nutritious a diet, the less food required to meet one’s needs. Prevention trumps treatment. 

Invest in your health today, so you do not have to pay for it tomorrow.

To begin, assess what your next 7+ days look like:

  • Do you have dinner plans anywhere, will you be able to reheat or cook at home for dinner, lunch and/or breakfast? If so, how often this week?
  • How many people are you responsible for feeding? (You will need to buy more, make more)
  • Do you have any long days of work ahead, or night errands to run? (You will need something portable)
  • Make a grocery list with meals in mind, yet, don’t feel the need to buy everything raw or from fancy health stores. 

The most important thing to eating right is a plan. I always tell clients, “If they fail to plan, they plan to fail.” And this is quite important so one knows the proper amount of food to buy. We don’t want to buy a garden of produce if we end up tossing it out. Literally sketch out 7 days and plot 3 meals, based on real food, plus snacks (if needed) for each day. Real food is real medicine.

A French man once said he walked into a North American grocery store and couldn’t find any food.

How does this make sense? Well, if you think about and roam the aisles and food labels enough, you will find that this certain man is onto something. A majority of our food in the US that has a label on it, is not real food. Just this morning I was running grocery errands and picked up a dozen of products and set them right back down because of cheap, unhealthy ingredients listed such as GMO beets (sugar), canola oil (very inflammatory), food colorings, chemicals, HFCS, more sugar, MSG, artificial sweeteners, BHA/BHT, nitrates, sulfates, the list goes on. Yet, my point is, know what is good for you and have an idea of where to get it.

Next up, shopping. Some places of interest and easy on the wallet:

Costco – Kerrygold butter and cheese (comes from grassfed cows; richer in fat soluble vitamins and CLA), organic greens, organic frozen veggies and fruit (frozen items are one secret to not wasting food and always having something healthy available), Columbus Deli Meat (gluten free, hormone free), raw nuts, Clean 15 fruit, organic free range chicken, organic eggs, almond milk, canned tuna, canned tomatoes, spices, nuts.

Trader Joe’s – organic greens, organic apples, grassfed ground beef, or lean beef, tahini dip (to help enjoy vegetables), wine, nuts, coffee, Kerrygold butter, New Zealand cheese (grassfed), gluten free oats, black rice, almond butter, spices, prosciutto, Columbus brand deli meat, uncured turkey bacon, chicken sausages, organic tomatoes, organic tomato paste, almond milk, coconut milk, rice cakes, nut butters, nuts.

Walmart Express – they also have a great organic section (buy organic only when budget allows and focus on the Dirty Dozen). Walmart Express also has a great seafood section with lots of wild fish (vs farmed), almond milk, coconut milk, almond meal, condiments.

Overall these suggestions can be applied to local grocery stores too.

Additional ways to save:

  • Look at ads, use coupon apps available on smartphones
  • buy ingredients, not products
  • by produce in season, when cheapest
  • grow your own vegetables/herbs
  • never overeat and see how the quality of food, not volume, makes you feel satisfied (intuitive eating)
  • cook in bulk and freeze portions for leftovers
  • buy in bulk, and choose ingredients that can used in multiple dishes
  • buy whole, canned wild fish, frozen fish
  • buy fruits and vegetables frozen (just as healthy, if not more healthy)
  • buy cheaper cuts of meat and slow-cook it to get it tender
  • don’t major in minor things. Focus on buying real food and don’t stress if you can’t get organic or grassfed
  • avoid foods void in nutrition, which can simply just increase appetite. For example, gluten containing grains, sugar, processed food, granola bars
  • cut out the extras – coffee, bottled water, etc
  • keep food simple, yet, have variety so your palate doesn’t get bored.

Food prep can be therapeutic; especially when you look at it as a time to unwind and forget about work stresses, etc. We need to unplug, to recharge. Set aside time, one time a week, to prep meals and snacks, so when you come rushing in the door, or out, you have something nutritious to quickly reheat or consume within a short window of time.

Meal Ideas:

  • Frittata – these are great, and can be made in advance, sliced and heated or chilled for a well-rounded breakfast or lunch. The ingredients do not need to be elaborate. Choose some produce, lean meat and spices. 
  • Salad with Tuna – as simple as it sounds. When I was on the road a lot with work, I would run to the grocery before Monday AM, pick up a bag of lettuce greens, canned tuna, eggs (then hard boil them) and some other type of produce, and throw it all together for 3 lunches or so a week. 
  • Lettuce Tacos – buy some lean meat, mix some spices and throw it over some vegetables or romaine leaves. Leftover meat is great with eggs too. 
  • Grilled Fish and Frozen Veg with spices – buy some frozen fish in bulk, pull out however many filets you need in the morning, thaw in the refrigerator, and cook in a skillet with some lemon, butter and pepper and pair with a vegetable. 
  • Scrambled Eggs and Ham – simple, cheap and satisfying. 
  • Banana Pancakes – take 2 eggs and one small banana, mash, and make 2 pancakes. 

Real change is not easy, but it is worth it.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

Jun 10

Another T1 DM Using the Paleo Lifestyle to Manage Blood Sugars

photoI had the pleasure to connect with Shelby Hughes, a fellow type 1 diabetic, to talk about the great use of a paleo lifestyle to gain health, and more so find more ease in controlling blood sugars. Have a look at our conversation and please share if you have found similar things in your diet transition.

How long have you had diabetes? I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2008 at age 39 years old. Originally I was diagnosed with Type 2, but after changing my diet, taking oral medication and performing daily exercise wasn’t helping my blood sugars, I had additional lab work that confirmed I had the antibodies for Type 1.

What eating regime have you found to be most helpful in managing stable blood sugars and how did you come to find this diet? When I was first diagnosed with diabetes, I researched online and found that many diabetics (both Type 1 and 2) had been successful following a low carb diet. When I switched to this type of diet, I did see improvement in my blood sugars. However, I was not able to maintain a low-carb lifestyle for a long period of time. Eventually I “fell off the low-carb wagon” and started eating a Standard American Diet again. My blood sugars were always on a rollercoaster!  In January 2013, after hearing about the Paleo and Primal lifestyle from an online friend with diabetes, I decided I would try a Paleo framework for eating. Initially I was going to do it for just two weeks. After two weeks, I noticed that my blood sugars were AMAZINGLY stable. I didn’t have lows, I didn’t have highs. I never looked back!

What main improvements in your health have you observed, diabetic-related or not? Besides having very stable blood sugars (I can literally count on one hand the number BOTH lows and highs I’ve had since starting eating within the Primal/Paleo framework. My sleep has improved (I was having terrible issues with insomnia last fall, before changing my diet). I have lost weight, but I think that’s mainly because I’m staying within or just below my caloric requirements and I’ve increased my exercise. But I do have tons of energy. I was never a runner, EVER, but I completed my first 5K in March and I’m training now for a 10K. In fact, I never liked exercising at all, but now it’s like I HAVE to move my body or I feel like I’m going to crawl out of my skin! Other changes I’ve noticed are that my skin breaks out less and I don’t get mouth ulcers (I was getting them weekly before I made the changes).

Do you find the diet realistic and something to maintain long term? Would you recommend it to others managing their diabetes? I honestly believe this is a lifestyle I can manage long term. There are so many good Paleo substitutes for my favorite “comfort foods” that I just don’t feel like I’m missing out. I make cauliflower crust for my pizza, I make muffins with almond and coconut flour, I make “pasta” with spaghetti squash or zucchini “noodles”. Many people think that Paleo or Primal means “low carb” but it doesn’t have to! I eat tons of fruit and starchy vegetables like butternut squash and sweet potatoes. I am definitely eating carbs! And it’s funny…I’ve noticed that fruit and starchy veggies don’t spike my blood sugar like grains do. I won’t say that I’ll never eat another grain in my life…there may be a special occasion that warrants it! But since I love how I feel and love how stable my blood sugar is, it’s just not worth it to me to change back to eating a Standard American Diet.

What does a typical day of food look like to you? I’m a creature of habit, so I like to eat the same thing a lot of times.

Breakfast:  Green smoothie with fruits and veggies, a hardboiled egg, and bacon.

Lunch: a big (I mean big!) salad with grilled chicken, avocado, artichoke hearts, eggs, bacon, tomatoes, raisins, nuts, seeds, mushrooms, cucumbers, balsamic and olive oil dressing, and a nut flour muffin and fresh fruit.

Dinner: some kind of meat (pork, chicken, shellfish, beef), some kind of green vegetable (leafy greens or Brussels sprouts – usually whatever is fresh from the farmer’s market or available from our CSA bag) and some kind of starchy veggie or “grain-like” food – roasted butternut squash, acorn squash “fritters”, sweet potatoes, or maybe cauliflower “breadsticks.” I’m not really a “dessert” person, but I do drink a glass or two of red wine before dinner each night.

What is the best thing about the diet? One of the best things is that you can pretty much eat anywhere and get something that falls within the framework. When I first started, I had to go out of town for work and stay at a hotel. Of course that means eating out every meal. But you can get a big salad pretty much anywhere, and you can always ask that your “burger” or whatever be served without a bun. Of course now when I travel I plan ahead and pack snacks that can be meals: hardboiled eggs, homemade beef jerky, kale chips, homemade “larabars”, fruit, nuts, seeds, etc.

Any tips for someone getting started on this type of diet? Before I started, I bought the cookbook “Practical Paleo” by Diane Sanfilippo.  It has the most beautiful full page pictures of food and some great recipes. I bought the book and decided I would make something from it each week. Next thing I knew I had tried several new foods that my husband and I both loved, and it was easy to transition to the next step of eliminating grains. I also used many blogs on the internet – you can google any food and add the keywords “paleo” or “primal” and get tons of great recipes. Mark’s Daily Apple is another great resource for people wanting more information.

Anything in addition you’d like to say? I think some people get the wrong idea about the Paleo or Primal framework because like with all things, there are extremists out in the land of the internet. Also, depending on the source, different people have different ideas about what is “paleo” and what is not. I think that there is no black and white answer…it’s not about “what the cavemen ate,” it’s about nourishing your body with foods that you love and that help your body perform at its very best.

Thanks for sharing your insight Shelby! Perhaps your story will inspire others to seek change and gain health.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kel

Jun 02

Recommended Grocery List

If we fail to plan, we plan to fail. Eating healthy begins with a good grocery list and having an idea of what meals to make for the week ahead. More tips and advice below.

Produce - focusing on seasonal produce and organic if possible

  • Veggies – lots and lots!
  • Sweet potatoes – great for sweet potato chips or just oven roasted with butter or coconut oil.
  • Mushrooms – use these in everything, from eating raw to throwing in eggs.
  • Wild green
  • Broccoli – usually buy frozen in bulk, therefore, no stress on consuming it before it may spoil.
  • Zucchini, asparagus, brussels sprouts, cabbage, all pending on the planned meals for the week.
  • Cauliflower – use as cauli mash or cauli rice.
  • Fresh herbs – can really change the way a meal tastes, and provide antioxidants and helps detoxify our body.
  • Avocado – helps heal us from the inside out.
  • Frozen berries – for those nights I want something sweet – coconut cream, cocoa nibs and berries.
  • Bananas – so good frozen
  • Jicama – full of fiber and great for dicing in a stiry-fry, salad or slice cylinders and use as a chip.
  • Lemons/Limes

Health Tips:

Eat fermented foods daily. You can find options at Whole Foods (including Kombucha), fermented vegetables at the farmer’s market and online at wisechoicemarket.com.

Overall diversify the types of produce you eat weekly, even simply rotate the type of salad greens you eat.

Meat/Seafood

  • Anything grass fed/free range at a good price – beef, lamb, venison, pork
  • Nitrate free bacon – shortcut or Canadian bacon
  • Organic, free-range poultry – opt for skin-on, bone in. Both of these elements are mineral rich and good for our body.
  • No nitrate, hormone free, gluten free deli meat (Boar’s Head, Applegate, Columbus
  • WILD Salmon, tilapia, scallops, calamari, tuna, cod, shrimp – usually buy frozen and some fresh if eating same day.
  • Sardines

Health Tips:

If you don’t have access to quality protein sources there are some great online stores and possible local CSA’s. I recommend US Wellness Meats, Tropical Traditions, Vital Choice (awesome seafood) and Eat Wild websites. Amazon is great for getting certain ingredients, including jerky.

Choose wild caught fish and not farmed. The nutritional profiles in wild are better and contain fewer toxins.

Dairy

  • Organic (grassfed is even better) butter
  • Full fat, organic and grassfed cheese
  • Free range, organic eggs

Compared to official U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data for commercial eggs, eggs from hens raised on pasture contain: 1/3 less cholesterol, 1/4 less saturated fat, 2/3 more vitamin A, 2 times more omega- 3 fatty acids, 3 times more vitamin E, and 7 times more beta carotene.*

Aisles

  • Pickles
  • Oils such as coconut, macadamia nut and high quality olive oil
  • Nuts – store them in a cool place, heat can turn them rancid
  • Coconut flour and cream/milk
  • Dark chocolate and cocoa nibs
  • Himalayan sea salt
  • Hot sauce and spices
  • Tea and coffee (organic coffee)
  • Raw honey (real raw honey)
  • Salsa ( no corn or wheat ingredients)
  • Chia, hemp, whole seeds (soak chia seeds overnight in water or unsweetened almond milk/coconut milk to have a porridge like texture)
  • Tamari (gluten free soy sauce)

References:
Lopez-Bote, C. J., R.Sanz Arias, A.I. Rey, A. Castano, B. Isabel, J. Thos (1998). “Effect of free-range feeding on omega-3 fatty acids and alpha-tocopherol content and oxidative stability of eggs.” Animal Feed Science and Technology 72: 33-40.

May 29

Happy Birthday My Love! @ChiSchmidtty

We’ve been through a lot together, 

You’ve seen my at my best, my worst, and first thing in the morning.

We’ve laughed and kissed and argued and loved, and held hands.

When I look back on this story of “us,”

I realize I’m happier than I’ve ever been. 

And it’s all because of you.

Happy birthday with all my love! 

bday

May 23

Five Ways to Enhance Your Health this Season

I will admit, I still have my coat hanging next to my front door here in Chicago, even though it’s “Spring.” The rainy weather and gray sky is not holding me back on my plans for stepping into health this month, summer and beyond. Here is my game plan and suggestions for others looking to do the same.

5 Ways to Step-up Your Health this Spring and Summer:

  • Never overeat, nor undereat. I guess it doesn’t matter what season it is to follow this “rule,” but with warm weather, can come more BBQs, happy hours, social events, etc, and the last thing I would want any client to do is skip or skimp on their morning meal to “save” calories for the evening. Undereating can be just as stressful on the body as overeating. So what do you do? Eat smarter. Presume (or start) having a solid breakfast with at least 20-40 grams of protein (gender depending) and if you have a big night ahead, perhaps cut back on the carbohydrates you typically eat, but do not under do it. Leading to the afternoon’s or evening’s event, make smart choices, stay hydrated and eat clean. Once the party starts enjoy the company and the food, but not too much of either. Alcohol can inhibit our best interest and your hard work doesn’t need sabotaged by an extra drink.
  • Broaden your food choices. Come spring and summer, more lovely produce reaches their peak season. What does this mean? Easier (and cheaper) to locate, and the crops actually taste better. For example, it’s so easy to locate organic strawberries right now. Slice some up and threw them into scrambled eggs with coconut oil, dress them into a salad, eat them plain or with some almond milk or coconut cream. Hello tastebuds! I have also done up Brussel sprouts in a variety of ways from savory, with roasted onion and garlic, to sweet, baked with sliced dates. Get creative, keep your mouth entertained with the flavors this season has to offer.
  • Use food reward and palatability the right way to improve body fat. What do I mean? If a food is very palatable, people will eat 44% more of that food. And what I mean by “very palatable,” I am talking about industrialized (food with either added sugar, salt, color and/or added fat to enhance the flavor thus chemical response to our brain. If we eat whole food, in it’s natural form, we are less likely to over-consume. So know your triggers – perhaps something that is fat laden with sugar or starch (ice cream, fries, doughnuts, etc) or salty (think about the difference when eating raw almonds vs roasted, salted almonds, which will you eat more of?) and visual cues (we are more likely to eat more of a food if it’s multi-colored (tortilla chips) than if they were all the same color). The variety distracts your mind to understand how much you have eaten.
  • Nurture your sleep routine, and if you don’t have one, create one. When we are tired, we are less capable to sticking to our health choices. We often opt towards the sweeter, higher calorie foods. Overall, we as a nation, are getting 20% less sleep than we need. Less sleep = cognitive impairment. Less sleep shows about 300 more calories a day. We tend to be more impulsive on less sleep. Inhibitory control is lost. Sleep has the strongest correlation to obesity compared to diet and fitness. To enhance your sleep, allow an hour to 45 minutes before getting in bed to wind down (put the computer away). Have your bedroom at a cool temperature and create a pitch black room. Buy chamomile oils or lavender oils to help you relax and lastly when laying in bed, tell yourself all the things you are thinking, can be thought about tomorrow. 

BONUS!

  • Don’t compare yourself to others – our body’s, including metabolism and gene expressions all work in different ways. That is why some people can eat loads of bread and gain nothing, when the next person smells the stuff and puts on 5 pounds. Not literally, but I think you can level with me.
  •  Don’t major in minor things. Sometimes eating “perfectly” can do us more harm than good. The stress of adding a drop of cream in an organic coffee or a GMO corn kernel in a stir-fry is not worth the stress (depending on what type of lifestyle/diet you are trying to follow). Surely it is if you have intense negative symptoms from these foods (allergy) but don’t get your panties in a bundle over every bite you take. Focus on the main elements of eating clean and be satisfied if/when you have a superb eating day.

May 19

Smoothies!

If you have never tried a green smoothie, this recipe will be a good one to start with. Enjoy the flavor and more so, enjoy the health benefits.

Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

  • 2 large handfuls spinach leaves (2-3 cups)
  • 3-4 large romaine lettuce leaves
  • 1/2 avocado, peeled and pitted
  • 1/2-1/3 peeled banana, you can even use frozen to make the drink even colder (use less or more, depending on your carb needs)
  • 1/2 cup frozen berries
  • 1 tbsp hemp seeds or soaked chia seeds
  • 1/2 cup purified water, almond milk, coconut water or coconut milk
  • 3 ice cubes
  • 1 scoop Raw Protein powder
  • 1 tsp maca powder

Directions:

Wash all produce thoroughly and prepare it for the blender. Blend all ingredients until smooth; 30-60 seconds depending on your blender. Add more liquid if needed to blend. Best if served immediately (nutritionally and for taste).

Tip: The ingredient measurements in green smoothies are flexible, add more or less of any ingredients to your taste.

Similar articles:

10 Cancer-Fighting Juice & Smoothie Recipes

Mini Detox To Rev Up Your Metabolism

Heavy Metal Detox Juice (Good for PCOS clients or hypothyroid clients)

Surprising Things a 10 Day Juice Detox Taught Me

Also, check out this guide to continue building the perfect green drink.

May 09

Taco Time

Have you ever looked at the ingredient list on pre-made taco seasoning? If you have, you are aware of the unnecessary fillers such as corn starch and wheat. And these are the ingredients we can pronounce! My point being, is instead of buying a taco seasoning packet, simply use your spice rack for the Mexican dinner. This is what I do for my family.

Clean Eating Tacos:

  • 1 pound of grassfed beef (or very lean ground beef)
  • Optional – 1/2 onion and/or bell pepper
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika 
  • 3 tsp cumin
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper
  • 1/4 tsp fresh oregano (dried if frsh isn’t handy) 
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt or himalayan salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground pepper

Method:

Heat ground meat (and onion or some fresh diced bell pepper) on high.  Cook, stirring frequently to break up the meat, until fully cooked, about 8 minutes.
Add spices to beef.  If the meat appears dry, add 1-2 Tbsp of water. Stir to fully incorporate.
Turn temperature down to medium and cook another 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally. I often stir in some salsa at the very end to add more moisture and flavor.

Enjoy!

We usually eat our tacos w romaine lettuce leaves and homemade guacamole  Oh! And I can’t forget to mention, save the leftovers for a killer taco omelette in the morning.

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